Miniature artist creates fairytale worlds with wildlife scenes and wearable jewelry

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A California-based artist weaves the magic of fairy tales with her scenes of miniature wild animals, rendered as wearable jewelry, ornaments, and even teacups.

Alexis Savopoulos, 25, has been fascinated by “everything small” since childhood. She now works out of a home studio near the ocean in Orange County.

“I can blissfully lose myself in the complexities of nature, like the microworlds of lichen and moss, or the wings of an insect, or the dew on a spider’s web,” Alexis told Epoch. times by e-mail. “This is where I give free rein to my imagination.”

(Courtesy of Alexis Savopoulos)
Epoch Times Photo
(Courtesy of Alexis Savopoulos)

Alexis’ artistic journey began with opening a small business as a jeweler in 2012, before moving into painting and sculpture a few years later. The young artist has mixed these three mediums with which she is “intimately familiar” and her collection of magical miniature works of art, Meadow & Fawnwas born.

“Small moments spent in my garden or hiking in the woods have, over time, led to the urge to create small worlds from my own – often whimsical – imagination through the liberating outlets of sculptures and paintings,” she said.

Alexis can be in nature or in his studio when an idea for a sculpture comes to mind. She will take her journal to make a quick sketch, before molding the beginnings of a sculpture from clay and paint.

Epoch Times Photo
(Courtesy of Alexis Savopoulos)
Epoch Times Photo
(Courtesy of Alexis Savopoulos)
Epoch Times Photo
(Courtesy of Alexis Savopoulos)

Alexis presented the wildlife scenes in a variety of ways, including antique or shadow boxes, glass bells, or medallions buried within. She often adds “more history” to her scenes by adding handcrafted paper plants, preserved moss or lichen, and painted backdrops.

A sculpture can take between a few days and several weeks, depending on its size. “My pieces speak of my admiration for the soft side of the forest and its inhabitants,” Alexis said, “and, more frequently lately, underwater creatures.”

Since learning to render water scenes by sealing her creations in epoxy resin, Alexis has also created water-based pieces such as a mother and her cub. humpback whale medallion and one swan and signet rings swim in a cup of tea.

She regularly shares new work on Instagram.

Epoch Times Photo
(Courtesy of Alexis Savopoulos)
Epoch Times Photo
(Courtesy of Alexis Savopoulos)

Alexis remembers playing with clay for the first time around the age of 7. She says her biggest artistic challenge is sculpting intricate micro-miniature animals from clay or creating plants from paper that are less than an inch in size. Some, she exclaimed, can be “the size of an ant.”

“I’m often asked if I’m designing with a magnifying glass,” she said. “I carve with my fingers and the precious help of sculpting tools or tweezers, as well as a serious dose of patience, which is not always easy to come by.”

She says “passion and patience” are key elements of her job, but spending time in nature or watching wildlife documentaries reinforces her passion for what she does; there is always something to learn from the natural world.

Daily encouragement from family and friends, as well as the artist’s social media community, also helps her continue her journey in miniature art. Alexis has struggled with anxiety in the past; its quiet studio, the sounds of birds and wind in the trees, and an audiobook playing in the background make it the most peaceful environment in which to create art.

Epoch Times Photo
(Courtesy of Alexis Savopoulos)
Epoch Times Photo
(Courtesy of Alexis Savopoulos)

“I still pinch myself when I think of how my little creations have garnered such a huge community of admirers,” Alexis said. “Some of the collectors who exhibit my pieces have told me that having my sculptures or paintings brings them a sense of calm and wonder.”

For Alexis, the greatest satisfaction is to help strengthen the links between man and wildlife.

“In a society that is increasingly moving away from nature towards a more consumerist and disconnected society, I find that reconnecting with our forests and oceans through small, enchanting and wild landscapes helps strengthen our relationship with nature” , she said, “and pushes us to come back and help in small but undulating waves.

See more of his works below:

Epoch Times Photo
(Courtesy of Alexis Savopoulos)
Epoch Times Photo
(Courtesy of Alexis Savopoulos)
Epoch Times Photo
(Courtesy of Alexis Savopoulos)
Epoch Times Photo
(Courtesy of Alexis Savopoulos)

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